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    New Lanark 2021: A Living Legacy

    From Robert Owen to World Heritage and Beyond

    12th - 14th October 2021

  • Conference 2021 Agenda
Conference Programme

Thursday 7th October – Youth Day

Tuesday 12th – Thursday 14th – Main Conference

 

  • Tuesday 12th October - Robert Owen's Educational Legacy / Company Towns and the Utopian Dream

    9.30 - 10.00 Opening Plenary - Jenny Gilruth MSP, Minister for Culture, Europe and International Development


    Robert Owen's Educational Legacy

    10.00 - 11.00 Dr John Crawford - Robert Owen Before Robert Owen

    10.00 - 11.00 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr John Crawford

    Dr John Crawford spent most of his career in higher education libraries specialising in quality management, information literacy and library and information history. In 2018 he was awarded an honorary fellowship by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in recognition of a career devoted to information studies. He has completed both MA and PhD theses in Scottish library history and authored over 100 refereed academic journal articles in the three areas specified above. He has written two books on the evaluation of library and information services and most of a third on the subject of information literacy, in addition to other articles and papers. He has presented extensively at conferences both in the UK and abroad. Some seven years ago he became chairman of Leadhills Heritage Trust and has worked to raise awareness of the importance of and increase understanding of Leadhills Miners Library and its collections. This has included radio and TV appearances and conference presentations including one in Finland two years ago.

    Paper: Robert Owen before Robert Owen

    This paper will draw attention to the key role of library activity in environmentally based social development in 18th century Scotland and will provide other examples of library activity in an industrial context which predate New Lanark where the importance of library activity was not initially recognised. It will challenge the view that industrially based educational and social philanthropy in Scotland originated at New Lanark in the early 19th century and in fact can be traced to Leadhills in South Lanarkshire, in the 1730s, in what was already becoming one of Scotland’s most important industrial centres.

    10.00 - 11.00 Dr Tom Woodin - Resuscitating Cooperative Traditions of Education

    10.00 - 11.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Tom Woodin

    Tom Woodin is a Reader in the Social History of Education at the UCL Institute of Education where he is the programme leader for the History of Education MA.

    Paper: Resuscitating Cooperative Traditions of Education

    Robert Owen had a long-standing influence upon the co-operative movement in Britain and internationally. Owenites impacted upon the movement through the nineteenth century and the memory of Owen has been kept alive by biographers, journalists and co-operatives. The history of co-operative movements is crucially a history of education and learning. It contains useable pasts with significant implications for the current day when co-operative values have been translated into schools, universities and the wider social economy. This presentation will reflect on the approaches to learning in the co-operative movement which were determined not only by the desire for well-educated members to drive a growing movement, but also by the parameters of mainstream education.

    11.15 - 11.45 Damien Rousseliere - Inclusion in Utopian Communities through Education and Library Access: A Comparison between Owenist and Icarian Communities

    11.15 - 11.45 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Damien Rousseliere

    Damien Rousselière, Professor of Economics, Institut Agro, AGROCAMPUS OUEST, Angers, France and Professor by courtesy, UQAM and Laval University (Canada).

    Paper: Inclusion in Utopian Communities through Education and Library Access: A comparison between Owenist and Icarian Communities

    Some previous research has highlighted the importance of education and library in various communal experiments, including Owenism and kibbutzim. The goal of such library is often to instill the philosophy of the movement in the hearts and minds of each generation. This presentation will compare and highlight the differences between Owenite libraries and Icarian libraries, and inspect the three distinct functions of the library in utopian communities - education, entertainment, and economics.

    11.15 - 11.45 David Watt - Fantastic Pictures of future Society: New Lanark 1799 - 1825

    11.15 - 11.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: David Watt

    David Watt lives in the south side of Glasgow. He worked as one of Scotland’s HMIs in areas of inclusive education, additional support and combating sectarianism and as senior education officer for Inclusion and Equalities in Education Scotland. In the past he has advised Scottish Government on children’s rights and codes of practice in education. Other areas of work include consultant with the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education reviewing achievement for all in Poland, Italy and Scotland and social charter consultant with Celtic Football Club. David is also secretary of the Socialist Educational Association Scotland. At present he works as an associate tutor at University of Glasgow on courses on system leadership and globalisation in education. David plays walking football, loves coffee and doesn’t travel globally as much as he did.

    Paper: Fantastic Pictures of future Society: New Lanark 1799 - 1825 An Institutionalised Social Order set alongside the Falls of Clyde yet built on the banks of the Mississippi

    In the Communist Manifesto Marx and Engels noted Robert Owen’s work at New Lanark and described the Owenite philosophy as Critical-Utopian Socialism and Communism. Owen’s visionary approach in his “Home Colonies” was evaluated somewhat critically in the Communist Manifesto as involving “fantastic pictures of a future society”. This paper will explore this perspective, and evaluate the strengths and successes of Owen’s management and leadership in New Lanark.

    12.00 - 13.00 Professor Christopher Chapman and Professor Mel Ainscow - The Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change: Pathways to Success

    12.00 -13.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Professor Christopher Chapman and Professor Mel Ainscow

    Before moving into academia Professor Christopher Chapman taught in challenging secondary schools in Birmingham where he undertook a part-time MA. He then completed his PhD thesis on intervention and improvement in schools in challenging circumstances. He held academic and research posts at the universities of Nottingham and Warwick, before being appointed Professor of Education at the University of Manchester. Professor Mel Ainscow is internationally recognized as an authority on the promotion of inclusion and equity in education. Previously a head teacher, local education authority adviser and lecturer at the University of Cambridge, his work focuses on ways of making schools effective for all children and young people. A long-term consultant to UNESCO, Mel is currently working to promote equity and inclusion globally. He is also a consultant to an initiative organised by the Organization of American States, which is supporting national developments in nine Latin American countries. He has recently completed collaborative research projects with networks of schools in Australia, England, Portugal and Spain. In addition to his post at Glasgow, Mel is Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Manchester, Adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology and Honorary Professor of Practice at University of Wales Trinity Saint David. He has published extensively in practitioner and international research journals. In the Queen’s 2012 New Year Honours list he was made a CBE for services to education.

    Paper: The Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change: Pathways to Success

    This paper will draw on over eight years of empirical research and developmental activity undertaken by the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change at the University of Glasgow. The focus is specifically on work undertaken in Scotland, and reflects on a range of design-based research programmes of work designed to improve outcomes for the most disadvantaged learners in our society; whereby all learners can achieve their full potential irrespective of their background.


    Company Towns and the Utopian Dream

    14.00 - 15.00 Professor Chris Williams - The New World of Robert Owen

    14.00 - 15.00 CORRA LINN ROON
    Speaker: Professor Chris Williams

    Chris Williams is Professor of History and Head of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences at University College Cork, having previously taught at the universities of Cardiff, Swansea and Glamorgan. With Noel Thompson he edited the volume Robert Owen and his Legacy (University of Wales Press, 2011) to which he contributed an essay on ‘Robert Owen and Wales’. His essay ‘Robert Owen: Socialist Visionary’, was published in Llafur: The Journal of Welsh People’s History, in 2010.

    Paper: The New World of Robert Owen

    This paper will seek to understand Owen’s ideas and strategies in his time, evaluate his failures as well as his achievements, and identify ways in which his legacy has been both championed and contested. It will engage with a range of recently published literature relating to Owen and Owenism, argue that the tendency for (as J. F. C. Harrison put it) there to be ‘a new view of Mr Owen’ in each age is both testament to Owen’s enduring appeal but also presents challenges in connecting what Owen means today to what Owen meant then. Owen was far from perfect, and his approach to problems and his personality limited his effectiveness at the same time as he was able to inspire devotion to his ideals and followers around the world.

    14.00 - 15.00 Ritsert Rinsma - Utopia in New Harmony: Robert Owen and William Maclure's Lasting Legacy

    14.00 - 15.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Ritsert Rinsma

    Born in the Netherlands in 1969, Ritsert Rinsma moved to France in 1990 and obtained two bachelor’s degrees, in Law and Business Administration, as well as two master’s degrees, in History and Anglo-American Literature (from the Universities of Le Havre and Rouen), before starting his career as a dedicated teacher and researcher, working part-time in the Universities of Caen and Le Havre, and several other institutions. His innovative research on Charles-Alexandre Lesueur began with the preparations for a Ph.D. Fluent in French, English, Dutch and German, he investigated archives and libraries across Europe and the U.S.A. to define C.-A. Lesueur’s impact on American science, and his role in William Maclure and Robert Owen’s utopian community in New Harmony, Indiana. He is the author of many scientific articles and a book in French. He also published a major work in English, entitled Eyewitness to Utopia: Scientific Conquest and Communal Settlement in C.-A. Lesueur’s Sketches of the Frontier.

    Paper: Utopia in New Harmony: Robert Owen and William Maclure's Lasting Legacy

    Many authors have written about the economical difficulties Robert Owen’s community in Indiana was facing between 1825 and 1827, underlining the rapid demise of the Social System, which occurred in less than two years. However, few people are aware that together with his financial partner, William Maclure, Owen was trying to find practical solutions to the many issues that threatened New Harmony’s existence. How did the leaders proceed to solve the material problems? Did the economical challenges cause the end of the utopian project?

    15.15 - 16.15 Dr Morris Altman - Changing the World One Step at a Time by Example: Building on the New Lanark Legacy

    15.15 - 16.15 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Morris Altman

    Morris Altman is Dean and Chair Professor at the University of Dundee Business School, and is Professor of Behavioral and Institutional Economics, and Cooperatives. Morris is on the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) international committee on research as well as that for the Asian-Pacific region.

    Paper: Changing the World One Step at a Time by Example: Building on the New Lanark Legacy

    Critical to driving socio-economic change is to provide real live examples of how doing things differently can actually work, and be operationalized in the real world. One needs to demonstrate visibly that ‘Utopia’ is viable in the real world. One also requires a robust ‘model’ to demonstrate that Utopia can be transformed into reality. This paper recognizes that Robert Owen and New Lanark experimented with new ways of engaging workers and their families.

    15.15 - 15.45 Dr Humberto Morales Moreno - Utopian Mexican Textile Mill Projects in the Time of Robert Owen 1829 - 1835

    15.15 - 15.45 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Humberto Morales Moreno

    Dr Humberto Morales Moreno is a university professor member of the Centre for Strategic Development Studies of the Institute of Government Sciences and Strategic Development of the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. He completed his doctoral studies in History at the University of Paris I(Sorbonne)and Law at the University Institute of Puebla (RENIECYT/CONACYT). He is the founder of several scientific societies such as the Mexican Association of Economic History AC, the Mexican Committee for the Conservation of Industrial Heritage AC and the Latin American Institute of Legal History, the last two as current president. He has published more than 20 books, more than 50 book chapters and more than 50 articles specializing in the areas of research at the national and international level.

    Paper: Utopian Mexican Textile Mill Projects in the Time of Robert Owen 1829 - 1835

    In 1828 Robert Owen was back to Britain after his New Harmony failure in Indiana in the USA. But trying to win some influence in America, he wrote a letter to the Mexican Government in order to propose a New Mexican Harmony in the late Federal State of Coahuila-Texas, in those years under pressure by the US foreign diplomacy. Vicente Rocafuerte (late President of the new Republic of Equator) was the Mexican attaché of the Legation in London in 1828-1829. Lucas Alamán was in charge of the Mexican Foreign Office and he met Owen in Britain and discussed with him this particular utopian project. In the aftermath, Owen could not convince Mexicans to let him Texas but his prior ideas were very important to prepare the future Mexican utopia with the first Latin American mechanized Textile Mill “La Constancia Mexicana” raised by Estevan de Antuñano in 1835. Saint Simon, Owen and Fourier settled utopian projects in the Mexican textile landscape that we can still highlight in the industrial heritage cultural landscapes that Mexico preserves today.

    15.45 - 16.15 Ed Archer - Robert Owen: The Pioneer of Community Living

    15.45 - 16.15 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Ed Archer

    From 1971-2001 Ed Archer worked as a teacher, mainly at Biggar High School. Involved in volunteer management, project management and society involvement, including the founding of the Lanark and District Archaeological Society. Ed is currently Chair of Lanarkshire Heritage Forum, and runs the Clydesdale's Heritage facebook page.

    Paper: Robert Owen: the Pioneer of community Living

    Robert Owen is well known for his experiments in Community Living both at Orbiston near Motherwell and New Harmony in the United States. This paper will however explore the pre Orbiston plans which are all but forgotten, and how this fed into his plans in New Harmony.

    16.00 - 16.30 Pere Colomer Roma - Borgonya a Scottish Company Town in Catalonia: The Foreign Welfare Management Policy of J&P Coats

    16.00 - 16.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Pere Colomer Roma

    Pere Colomer Roma is a graduate in Geography and History from the Universitat de Barcelona. Studies in Economics and Business Universitat de Barcelona. He is an independent researcher, and is currently working in a Research Team at the Barcelona History Museum preparing an exhibition about the History of Work in Barcelona with a specific chapter about the Work at the Fabra and Coats company

    Paper: Borgonya a Scottish Company Town in Catalonia: The Foreign Welfare Management Policy of JandP Coats

    Borgonyà was one of the most important and complete company towns in Catalonia with nice facilities (houses, church, schools, theatres, football field, shops...)..This paper will explore the social management policies applied by the company Fabra and Coats, and social policies applied across different factories and the “Catalan case”.

    16.30 - 17.30 Professor Gregory Claeys - Owen at 250

    16.30 - 17.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Professor Gregory Claeys

    Professor Gregory Claeys received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1983. He has taught in Canada, Germany, and the U.S., and is now Professor Emeritus of History at the University of London. He is the author of two studies of the Owenite movement, Machinery, Money and the Millennium: From Moral Economy to Socialism (Princeton University Press, 1987), and Citizens and Saints: Politics and Anti-Politics in Early British Socialism (Cambridge University Press, 1989). He has also edited several collections of Owen's writings, namely Robert Owen. A New View of Society and Other Writings (Harmondsworth: Penguin Classics Series; Penguin Books, 1991), and The Selected Works of Robert Owen (4 vols., London: Pickering and Chatto; The Pickering Masters Series, 1993), and Owenite Socialism: Pamphlets and Correspondence (10 vols., London: Routledge, 2005).

    Paper: Owen at 250

    This talk commences with reflections on the development of Owenite studies since the last great celebration of the man and his achievements on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his birth in 1771. It then asks the quintessential question as to the relevance of Owen's legacy today, concentrating on the environmental crisis and Owen's attitude towards "rational needs" as expressed both in his own writings and in the development of the Owenite communitarian movement in Britain and the United States.

    KEYNOTE - 19.30 - 21.00 John Pearce Memorial Lecture: Lesley Riddoch - Capable People - Hopeless Systems. Why do Scotland's Leaders still think Big is Beautiful?

    19.30 - 21.00 SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN THEATRE
    Keynote: Lesley Riddoch

    Lesley Riddoch is one of Scotland’s best-known commentators and broadcasters. Lesley was born in Wolverhampton to a mother from Wick and a dad from Banffshire, grew up in Belfast, moved to Glasgow at the age of 13, went to Oxford University (where she was the first non-Tory President of the Student's Union) and did a post-graduate course at Cardiff University. She still gets around a lot. She is best known for broadcasting with programmes on BBC2, Channel 4, Radio 4 and BBC Radio Scotland, for which she won two Sony speech broadcaster awards. She produces the weekly Lesley Riddoch Podcast with co-presenter Patrick Joyce.

    Paper: Capable People - Hopeless Systems. Why do Scotland's Leaders still think Big is Beautiful?

    Scotland is one of the most centralised countries in Europe. That's partly what's driven the huge, successful movement for community control. But whilst community buyouts, community shares and other forms of social enterprise have been massively empowering, they've left the formal system completely intact. Despite land reform there's actually a greater concentration of landowners today than in 1872. Land is still generally unavailable and unaffordable leading to depopulation and rural homelessness - even though the shift to green energy and Scotland's massive tourist appeal means the jobs are there to create lively rural communities. Scotland also has the largest so-called 'local' government units in the developed world. It's completely normal for important decisions about a town, island or community to be taken by remote strangers. In the context of Northern Europe, this is beyond weird - and yet accepted in Scotland for far too long. What do Scotland's people need to prove before their governments dismantle these unfit for purpose top down systems - relics of a bygone age, when paternalistic authorities believed they alone could 'fix' the public? And if political parties continue to shrink from the challenge, what can people do to create transformational change?


    Round Table Topics & Speakers

    13.00 - 13.45 Roundtable: Owen's Influence on Education Today

    13.00 - 13.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Owen's Influence on Education Today - Our panel of educational practitioners will discuss how we see Owen's influence in education today, and what Owen might have thought of Scottish Education in the 21st century. Do we offer a 'rational system of education' for every man, woman and child, and how can we continue to develop our educational offer to be fit for life in the modern world?
    • Chair: Professor Chris Chapman
    • Professor Chris Chapman is a former secondary school teacher and founding director of the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change. He completed his PhD on intervention and improvement in schools in challenging circumstances and is currently a Professor with Glasgow University's School of Education

    • Suzanne Hughes
    • Suzanne Hughes is Head Teacher of Douglas Primary School, a small but busy school in South Lanarkshire. She believes in creating a friendly, positive and active school where every child reaches their full potential and continually strives to raise standards by providing stimulating activities and experiences that make learning enjoyable.

    • Payton Robertson
    • Payton Robertson is an Early Years Practioner working closely with ages 3 - 5 at Little People Nursery in Lanark, and a Beaver Cub leader. She recently grduated from University of the West of Scotland with a court medal for academic achievement and a First Class honours degree in Childhood Studies.

    17.30 - 18.30 Roundtable: Utopia/Dystopia: The Utopian Dream Then and Now

    17.30 - 18.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Utopia/Dystopia: The Utopian Dream Then and Now - Our panel of international practitioners and academics will discuss changing ideas of utopia and dystopia. What do we think of as Utopia in 2021? How is this different to Owen's ideas of Utopia? What is the line between Utopia and Dystopia?
    • Douglas Lloyd Major O.D.
    • Douglas Lloyd Major is a Doctor of Optometry who qualified in 1985, and has worked in Private Practice in California since. He has previously presented at a number of conferences, and has a keen interest in the life and legacy of Isaac Morley.

    • Dr Emiliano Rannochi
    • Dr Emiliano Rannochi holds a PhD in Polish Literature from Rome University and currently works as a fellow researcher at Udine University where he teaches Polish language and literature. He has been researching the Polish francophone writer Jan Potocki, uncovering a numer of unknown letters, memoires and essays. He is Deputy Editor in Chief of the quarterly review Autoportret.

    • Claire Eagle
    • Claire Eagle is interim Assitant Director of Historic New Harmony where she has led a number of successful programmes includign the current Robert Owen 250 celebrations. She holds a BSc in History and an MA in History with an Historical Administration emphasis from Eastern Illnois University.

    • Dr Humberto Morales Moreno
    • Dr Humberto Morales Moreno is a university professor member of the Centre for Strategic Development Studies of the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. He is the founder of several scientific societies including the Mexican Association of Economic History, and the Mexican Committee for the Conservation of Industrial Heritage.

    • Ritsert Rinsma
    • Ritsert Rinsma has investigated archives and libraries across Europe to define Charles - Alexandre Lesueur's impact on American science, and his role in William Maclure and Robert Owen's utopian community in New Harmony. Indiana. He published a major work entitled 'Eye witness to Utopia: Scientific Conquest and Communal Settlement in C.A. Lesueur's Sketches of the Frontier'.

  • Wednesday 13th October - Co-operation: History and Future / Challenging Histories: Slavery and Colonialism in the Textile Industry



    Co-operation: History and Future

    9.00 - 9.30 Dr Gillian Murray - The Co-operative Imagination: Tracing the Re-Animation of the Moral Economy in Scotland's Community Enterprises (1979 - 1997)

    9.00 - 9.30 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Gillian Murray

    Working as a Research Fellow at the Yunus Centre from 2014, Dr Gillian Murray’s current research investigates the history of social enterprise in Scotland. To date, this research has traced the development of Scotland’s social economy from the 1970s. From 2014 to 2018 she worked on the CommonHealth research programme. Since then, working closely with the GCU Archive Centre, she has been PI on a Scottish Government funded project to develop the Social Enterprise Collection (Scotland). Connected to this work, she contributes to a project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund with Magic Torch Comics. Gillian also supervision two doctoral projects investigating aspects of the history of social enterprise.

    Paper: The Co-operative Imagination: Tracing the Re-Animation of the Moral Economy in Scotland's Community Enterprises (1979 - 1997)

    This talk will argue that the industrial tradition was not the only sphere of action that nurtured the values of the moral economy. By examining how the co-operative tradition melded with the moral economy of industrial workers in the mid-twentieth century, it is possible to trace a reanimation of the moral economy within the movement for community enterprise, and open up new perspectives on deindustrialisation and life in Scotland in the late twentieth century.

    9.45 - 10.45 Jean-Louis Bancel, Jean-Francois Draperi, and David Rodgers - "Co-operative Commonwealth" versus "Co-operative Republic": Impacts of Two Hundred Years of Exchange of Ideas between British and French Co-operators on the International Co-operative Movement

    9.45 - 10.45 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speakers: Jean-Louis Bancel, Jean-Francois Draperi, and David Rodgers

    Jean-Louis BANCEL. French. Former mutualist and cooperative leader in the financial sector. Elected leader for many years in the French, European and global mutualist and cooperative movement. Chair of the "guidelines" group on the Guidance Notes to the Co-operative Principles published by the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) in 2015. Jean-Francois DRAPERI. French, Director of the Center for Social-Economy (CESTES, Conservatoire national des arts et métiers, Paris); editor in chief of the Revue internationale de l’économie sociale (Recma, Paris). Author of books on co-operatives. David RODGERS. British and Irish citizen, former chief executive of a secondary co-operative housing association, former president of Co-operative Housing International, former Labour and Co-operative Party councillor in London, and editor of the Guidance Notes to the Co-operative Principles published by the ICA in 2015.

    Paper: "Co-operative Commonwealth" versus "Co-operative Republic": Impacts of Two Hundred Years of Exchange of Ideas between British and French Co-operators on the International Co-operative Movement

    The authors, co-operators from France and Great Britain, will analyse the differences and convergences between two utopias mobilizing the cooperative movement of their country: "cooperative commonwealth" on the one hand and “cooperative republic” on the other.

    9.45 - 10.45 Liz McIvor and Sophie McCulloch - Exploring the Mythology of Robert Owen

    9.45 - 10.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speakers: Liz McIvor and Sophie McCulloch

    Liz McIvor manages the Co-operative Heritage Trust CIO – an independent charity formed to care for the heritage assets of the British co-operative movement. The Trust manages the Co-operative Archive and Rochdale Pioneers Museum. She is a social historian and museum curator of industrial history and previously worked for Bradford Museums and Galleries, Pembrokeshire County Museums, The National Trust, National Maritime Museum and Historic Royal Palaces. Sophie McCulloch is a qualified archivist who has worked for the Co-operative Heritage Trust for over a decade. She assisted on a successful bid to the National Archives to catalogue the Robert Owen papers. Previously she worked as a volunteer at the Liverpool Maritime Museum, Cheshire Record Office and the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral.

    Paper: Exploring the Mythology of Robert Owen

    Using the extensive collections of the Co-operative Heritage Trust Archive, this paper will explore the origins of the myth of Robert Owen; focusing on how he became known as the ‘Father of Co-operation’. The paper will use the collection of Owen’s personal correspondence as well as the published work of his associates to examine the extent of his involvement in the early co-operative movement and his influence on those who followed him. It will explore Owen’s positioning in the movement after his death, how his writings came to be deposited at the Archive, and to what extent this influenced the way Owen is still seen as a significant figure by the modern global co-operative movement.

    11.00 - 12.00 Dr Warner Woodworth - Robert Owen's Legacy : Worker-Owned Co-operatives and Resilience in a Time of COVID-19 and Economic Crisis

    11.00 - 12.00 CORRA LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Warner Woodworth

    Dr. Woodworth is a global social entrepreneur who’s helped raise $1.2 billion over two decades for combating poverty and reducing human suffering. He is author of 10 books and 260 articles while engaged in empowering the poor for over 4 decades. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in organizational behaviour from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Woodworth has been honoured with the Faculty Pioneer Award for global impacts from the Aspen Institute in NYC, the Social Entrepreneurship Teaching Award at the Skoll World Forum at Oxford University, and he was the first Peter Drucker Visiting Scholar in Social Entrepreneurship at the Drucker School, Claremont University in LA. After decades of being an MBA professor at the Marriott School of Business at BYU, he’s now a visiting faculty member at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

    Paper: Robert Owen's Legacy : Worker-Owned Co-operatives and Resilience in a Time of COVID-19 and Economic Crisis

    The vision and practical labors of Robert Owen have changed the world. His inspired utopian agenda has spawned a global movement for equality and communal justice. Yet between today’s Coronavirus pandemic and its resulting economic turmoil, the fate and resilience of cooperative economies have been tossed to and fro. Through the decades, worker ownership promised to offer a utopia of empowerment, good wages, board seats, productivity and the benefits of the ownership of business. This paper explores the impact of the current crisis on workplace democracy in Europe and the United States.

    11.00 - 11.30 Akira Kurimoto - Robert Owen’s Legacy to Co-operative Idea and Practice in Japan

    11.00 - 11.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Akira Kurimoto

    Akira Kurimoto studied law at the University of Tokyo. He was a professor of co-operative program at the Institute for Solidarity-based Society at Hosei University, Tokyo during 2015-2020. He was the board member/chief researcher of the Consumer Co-operative Institute, Japan since 1998 and the general secretary of the Robert Owen Association. He served as the Chair of the ICA Research Committee (2001-2005) and is the Chair of the ICA Asia Pacific Research Committee. He is a founding member of the Asia Pacific Co-operative Research Partnership which published a volume “Waking the Asian Pacific Co-operative Potential” in 2020. His main research interests include co-operative laws, co-operative economics, co-operative history, corporate governance, food supply chain, health and social care and the social economy/enterprises.

    Paper: Robert Owen’s Legacy to Co-operative Idea and Practice in Japan

    Robert Owen has been widely known across Japan through numerous translations of his work from 1874 onwards. He has been an inspiration to Japanese cooperative leaders. This paper will explore the ways that Owen has been repeatedly discovered and studied at different points in Japanese history, and the development of the Japanese cooperative movement.

    11.30 - 12.00 Professor Anthony Webster - British Consumer Co-operation: How the Archive has Changed Historical Perceptions

    11.30 - 12.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Professor Anthony Webster

    Professor Anthony Webster is a business historian of British empire and the Co-operative Movement. He is a former Governor of the Co-operative College in Manchester, a Trustee of the Co-operative Heritage Trust, and a Governor of Runshaw FE College in Lancashire. Tony is convenor of CoRNet, a developing network of researchers on co-operatives and social enterprises, which has run conferences and published several articles. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Common Purpose graduate.

    Paper: British Consumer Co-operation: How the Archive has Changed Historical Perceptions

    Between 2010 and 2019, Prof. Webster was heavily engaged in the history of British consumer co-operation, working with Professor John Wilson and Rachael Vorberg-Rugh, and independently. They were given unprecedented access to the rich collections of the Co-operative Group (now largely held by the Co-operative Heritage Trust), as well as personal interviews with a range of co-operators and co-operative managers. As a result, some perceptions of the history of the British consume movement have been radically changed. This paper will highlight these fresh perspectives.

    12.15 - 12.30 John Brodie - The Cooperative Movement Today

    12.15 - 12.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: John Brodie

    Chief Executive Officer, Scottish Midland Cooperative Society (Scotmid)

    The Cooperative Movement Today


    Challenging Histories: Slavery and Colonialism In The Textile Industry

    14.15 - 14.45 Dr Michael Morris - The 'Problem of Slavery' in the Age of Improvement: Robert Owen, New Lanark, and the Cotton Connections

    14.15 - 14.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Michael Morris

    Dr Michael Morris is Senior Lecturer in English Literature and History at University of Dundee. He is the author of Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833: Atlantic Archipelagos (Routledge, 2015), ‘Yonder Awa: Slavery and Distancing Strategies in Scottish Literature’ in Recovering Scotland’s Slavery Past: the Caribbean Connection (Edinburgh UP, 2016) and ‘Cultures of Improvement in Scottish Romanticism, 1707-1840, ed by Alex Benchimol and Gerard Lee McKeever, Routledge, 2018).

    Paper: The 'Problem of Slavery' in the Age of Improvement: Robert Owen, New Lanark, and the Cotton Connections

    In the wake of the Black Lives Matter campaigns and de-colonising agendas in the heritage sector, this paper argues that its cotton connections allow New Lanark to take a lead in writing slavery into the deeply entangled, intertwined, even interwoven, cultures of improvement in the Atlantic world.

    15.00 - 16.00 Susanne Seymour and Lisa Robinson - Engaging with the Textile Industry's Challenging Histories of Slavery and Colonialism: The Global Cotton Connections projects in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site

    15.00 - 16.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speakers: Susanne Seymour and Lisa Robinson

    Susanne Seymour is an Associate Professor in Geography at University of Nottingham, and currently Director of the University of Nottingham's Institute for the Study of Slavery, undertaking AHRC funded research on rural enslavement histories and legacies. Lisa Robinson is Director of Bright Ideas Nottingham - a vibrant, pioneering, community-based social enterprise that works with people to influence change and improvements in their communities.

    Paper: Engaging with the Textile Industry's Challenging Histories of Slavery and Colonialism: The Global Cotton Connections projects in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site

    This paper examines collaborative strategies developed in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS), Derbyshire since 2014 to research and communicate the historical connections of the area’s cotton textile industries with slavery and colonialism. Through a series of Global Cotton Connections (GCC) projects involving university researchers, a community social enterprise, volunteer groups of mainly African Caribbean and South Asian heritage and heritage professionals, a greater understanding has been developed of the history of the area’s slavery and colonial connectionsand how these can be effectively presented to publics in cotton mill heritage sites.

    19.30 - 21.00 KEYNOTE: Gordon Brown

    19.30 - 21.00 SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN THEATRE
    Keynote: Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010, Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1997 to 2007 and as a Member of Parliament in his home county of Fife, Scotland, from 1983 to 2015. He is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and is a passionate advocate for the rights of children. He believes every girl and boy deserves the opportunity of an education, learning and skills for the future. Gordon is Chair of the High Level Steering Group of Education Cannot Wait, the fund for education in emergencies; Chair of the Inquiry on Protecting Children in Conflict; and serves as Chair of the International Commission on Financing Global Education Opportunity. Gordon is the author of several books including Beyond the Crash: Overcoming the First Crisis of Globalisation and My Life, Our Times and most recently Seven Ways to Change the World (Simon and Schuster, June 2021).

    Paper: (PAPER TITLE)

    PAPER ABSTRACT


    Round Table Topics & Speakers

    12.30 - 13.15 Roundtable: Cooperation and Social Enterprise: Now and Then

    12.30 - 13.15 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Cooperation and Social Enterprise: Now and Then - Our panel of cooperators and historians will discuss Robert Owen's contribution to the worldwide cooperative movement, and how cooperation and social enterprise have evolved to the present day. How can cooperation and social enterprise be harnessed in the modern world? What will it look like in the future?
    • Chair: Iain Macdonald
    • Iain Macdonald is a Cooperative Consultant who was Director General of the International Cooperative Alliance from 2002 - 2010. At ICA he played a major role in developing the Global 300 report, which raised the profile of cooperative enterprises and has led to the development of the World Cooperative Monitor.

    • Nick Matthews
    • Nick Matthews is a serial cooperator. He has been involved in housing, printing, publishing, fair trade and retail coops. His is past Chair of Cooperatives UK, current Director of Heart of England Cooperative and a Senate Member of the Cooperative Group. He has taught about coops and social enterprise at Coventry University Business School.

    • Professor Zofia Chyra-Rolicz
    • Professor Zofia Chyra - Rolicz is an historian of the Polish Cooperative movement, as well as the social and cultural history of Poland, and the contemporary cooperative movement. Zofia is a Professor at Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Poland, and she is a board member of the Cooperative Society in Warsaw.

    • Niall McShannon
    • Niall McShannon founded Clydesdale Community Initiatives (CCI Scotland) in 2005 as a person centred, asset based organisation that supports people to make a contribution to their community. The social enterprise is supported by a number of businesses including an outdoor play and furniture construction company, a local food cooperative, and an environmental agency.

    • Jean-Louis Bancel
    • Jean-Louis Bancel is a former mutualist and cooperative leader in the financial sector. He is the current Chair of the "guidelines" group on the Guidance Notes to the Cooperative Principles published by the International Cooperative Alliance in 2015.

    • Alexandra Wilson
    • Coming Soon

    • Martin Meteyard
    • Coming Soon

    16.00 - 16.45 Roundtable: Challenging Histories in Industrial Heritage

    16.00 - 16.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Challenging Histories in Industrial Heritage - Our panel of practitioners and academics will discuss how we interpret histories of slavery, exploitation and empire for a contemporary audience. Who should tell these histories? How do we go about challenging our preconceptions and learned biases in order to tell the whole story of our industrial heritage?
    • Chair: TBC
    • Michael Morris
    • Michael Morris is Senior Lecturer in English Literature and History at University of Dundee. He is the author of 'Scotland and the Caribbean, c.1740 - 1833: Atlantic Archipelagos (Routledge, 2015), 'Yonder Awa: Slavery and Distancing Strategies in Scottish Literature' in 'Recovering Scotland's Slavery Past: the Caribbean Connection (Edinburgh UP, 2016), and 'Cultures of Improvement in Scottish Romanticism, 1707 - 1840, ed by Alex Benchimol and Gerard Lee McKeever, (Routledge, 2018)

    • Susanne Seymour
    • Susanne Seymour is an Associate Professor in Geography at University of Nottingham, and currently Director of the University of Nottingham's Institute for the Study of Slavery, undertaking AHRC funded research on rural enslavement histories and legacies.

    • Lisa Robinson
    • Lisa Robinson is Director of Bright Ideas Nottingham - a vibrant, pioneering, community-based social enterprise that works with people to influence change and improvements in their communities.

    • Elena Trimarchi
    • Elena Trimarchi is Learning and Engagement Manager at David Livingstone Birthplace in Blantyre, Scotland. Her academic work focused on researching and creating autism-friendly heritage engagement opportunties and, over the last 4 years, Elena has strived to make the multi-layered and complex histories of David Livingstone relevant to 21st century audiences worldwide.

    • Natalie Milor
    • Natalie Milor is Curator at the David Livingstone Birthplace where she has led the research and production of the museum's new interpretation, working with a range of volunteers, experts and consultants. Natalie has worked for a range of national and independent organisations with most of her experience centred on managing, researching, and increasing accessibility to collections.


  • Thursday 14th October - World Heritage: Global and Local Communities / Looking to the Future: Industrial Heritage Conservation and Redevelopment

    World Heritage: Global and Local Communities

    9.00 - 10.00 Graham U'ren: The Restoration of New Lanark

    9.00 - 10.00 BONNINGTON LINN
    Speaker: Graham U'ren

    An experienced consultant with a long history of working at a senior level in the planning and development industry in public, private and voluntary sectors, Graham U'ren was previously a Trustee of New Lanark Trust. He is currently a trustee of both Lanark Community Development Trust, and World Heritage UK. He is a Fellow of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and has a keen interest in Robert Owen and the Scottish Enlightenment. He is passionate about making our heritage work for a better society, but also about his family, his garden, his bird stamp collection and Glasgow Warriors.

    Paper: The Restoration of New Lanark

    This paper deals with the challenges of the restoration of the historic fabric of New Lanark, but especially during the early days leading to the formation of the organisations responsible and the processes involved in securing ownership and funding to deliver the original intention of the 1973 report “A Future for New Lanark”. The impetus behind the restoration acheivements at New Lanark would not have been possible without the insight and courage of many local and national personalities, most of whom have sadly passed away. This paper will celebrate their contributions as well as that of Robert Owen himself, and the successive proprietors who maintained a benevolent management of this enlightenment factory community over 180 years.

    9.00 - 9.30 Rosalyn Watson: World Heritage, Tourism and Community Participation in the Northern Isles of Scotland

    9.00 - 9.30 STONEBYRES LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Rosalyn Watson

    Rosalyn Watson is a MA postgraduate student in World Heritage Studies at Birmingham University with a research focus on cold water heritage tourism and sustainability

    Paper: World Heritage, Tourism and Community Participation in the Northern Isles of Scotland

    Community welfare and tourism sustainability are important but often secondary priorities when it comes to World Heritage listing. This paper will discuss community relations with the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage site, inscribed in 1999, and the rifts which have appeared between the community and managing heritage bodies, as well as the communities’ views and relations to tourism at the site.

    9.30 - 10.00 Professor Anna Leask: Engaging Local Residents as Stakeholders in World Heritage Sites

    9.30 - 10.00 STONEBYRES LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Professor Anna Leask

    Anna Leask is Professor of Tourism Management and a key member of Business School at Edinburgh Napier University. Her teaching and research interests combine and lie principally in the areas of visitor attraction management, heritage tourism and destination management. She has co-edited several textbooks including Managing Visitor Attractions (2008) and Managing World Heritage Sites (2006), and has published in key academic journals. Anna is a Fellow of the Tourism Society and of the Higher Education Academy. She is a Visiting Professor at Wakayama University, Japan.

    Paper: Engaging Local Residents as Stakeholders in World Heritage Sites

    Many World Heritage (WH) sites attract significant numbers of visitors that subsequently requires effective stakeholder engagement to plan, develop and manage the site in a sustainable manner (Leask, 2019). These WH sites are often reliant on visitors for economic sustainability and therefore may be considered as heritage visitor attractions, ‘natural, cultural or built assets that have been created or converted into a permanent visitor experience, where visitor interpretation and engagement with the asset is a core purpose of the development and management of the site’ (Leask, 2018).

    10.15 - 11.15 Heather Alcock: Global Value of Local Places - A Transnational Historiography of Port Sunlight Village

    10.15 - 11.15 STONEBYRES LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Heather Alcock

    Heather L M Alcock is a PhD student at Liverpool School of Architecture, University of Liverpool and a Project Officer (World Heritage) at Port Sunlight Village Trust.

    Paper: Global Value of Local Places - A Transnational Historiography of Port Sunlight Village

    Heritage site management and engagement have started to address unanswered (often unasked) questions about the history of sites that at first glance appear to be local or regional but were developed as the result of international networks of people, ideas and goods, many with complex or contested histories. This research re-examines the historiography of the built environment for Port Sunlight village, to define and reflect its international impact and the transmission of ideas, images and people from 1889 through 1939.

    11.30 - 12.00 Professor Mark Watson: New Lanark's Entry to the World Heritage List

    11.30 - 12.00 STONEBYRES LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Mark Watson

    Born in Dundee, Mark took degrees in History and Industrial Archaeology in the English midlands, worked in museums and then joined what is now Historic Environment Scotland, listing buildings and managing change to historic buildings and conservation areas across Scotland. He wrote the nomination for New Lanark’s inclusion in the UNESCO World Heritage List (inscribed 2001) and parts of that for the Forth Bridge (2015). In at the start of two Europa Nostra award-winning projects (Knockando and Stanley Mills), he is the UK national rep for The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage (TICCIH) and researches textile mill history, architecture and industrial heritage.

    Paper: New Lanark's Entry to the World Heritage List

    14 December 2001: the World Heritage Committee was meeting in Finlandia Hall, Helsinki. There too was Jim Arnold, Director of New Lanark Conservation Trust, whose near-lifetime work had been the ‘revivification’ of New Lanark, and so was I and representatives of other nominated sites, including Derwent Valley Mills, Saltaire and The Jurassic Coast for the UK.

    This presentation will set out the run-up to that momentous day: the 1980s nomination, deferral and referral by UNESCO, a new UK tentative list (1998), the role in the 1990s of the local authority and its newly enlarged New Lanark Conservation Area, and of New Lanark Conservation Trust in making significant improvements to New Lanark (Mill One, and the School); the new nomination in 2000, the buffer zone, a management plan and the assessment visit (can we find a route avoiding those “World Heritage Village” signs? How effective will our planning systems be judged? Is the property authentic and well-managed?). Next, the cut and thrust of the World Heritage Committee in which the UK then had a seat, able to interrogate other sites and raise broad World Heritage issues but having no say in determining the outcome of UK nominations. Would our three chosen criteria be accepted, even criterion (vi) on intangible values that had to be linked to tangible aspects of a place? Will diplomats even recognise heritage values at all in industrial communities, or will they detect dark aspects, like the enslaved people used to grow cotton during the Dale and Owen periods? What next? All will be revealed.

    11.30 - 12.00 Dr Rebecca Jones: Celebrating New Lanark and Scotland's World Heritage

    11.30 - 12.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Rebecca Jones

    Dr Rebecca Jones is Head of Archaeology and World Heritage at Historic Environment Scotland and a Visiting Professor at Heriot-Watt University. A graduate of the universities of Newcastle and Glasgow, she completed doctoral research on aspects of the Roman army in Scotland and led the mapping for the successful inscription of the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage property.

    Paper: Celebrating New Lanark and Scotland's World Heritage

    New Lanark was the fourth World Heritage property created in Scotland, one of only six currently inscribed (with a seventh – the Flow Country – due to be formally nominated to UNESCO in 2023). Each site is very different from one another, but all demonstrate their Outstanding Universal Value to humanity.


    Looking to the Future: Industrial Heritage Conservation and Redevelopment

    14.15 - 15.15 Davi Neto, Ronaldo Pereira and Wagner Belo - The Challenges of Conservation of Industrial Heritage in Brazil: The Case of Companhia Textil Brasil Industrial

    14.15 - 15.15 STONEBYRES LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Davi Neto, Ronaldo Pereira and Wagner Belo

    Davi Neto worked as a chemical engineer and as a chemistry teacher and lecturer. In 2007, he was appointed Professor of Environment, Work Place Safety and Chemistry at the Federal Institute of Rio de Janeiro. He retired in 2019 but continues to work as Volunteer Professor at the Centre for Studies of the Memory of Textiles Industries in Paracombi, as well as studying for qualifications in history and cultural heritage. Ronald Pereira has a Master in Assets and Social Projects from the School of Social Sciences of the Getulio Vargas Foundation, a Bachelor’s in arts from the Methodist Bennett Institute, and has studied Sacred Arts at São Bento College and also at the Franciscano Museum, both in Rio de Janeiro. Currently, he plays the role of painter, draftsman and ceramist. During his professional career, he received 31 awards. For more than 15 years, he has worked as Visual Arts Professor at Federal Institute of Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ). He also coordinates the projects “Sacred Art History, Cultural Routes”, making field visits to museums, cultural spaces, as well as historic cities as the best way to appreciate and understand works of art and their historical context. Dr Wagner Belo has Bachelor Degree in Liberal Arts and Spanish Literature from Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (1999), master's degree from Universidade Federal Fluminense (2006) and Doctorate Degree in Applied in Latin Languages from Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (2014). He has an extensive experience in Management of Public Polices, focusing on International, Bilateral and Multilateral Relations, acting on the following subjects: international relations, management of international cooperation, academic international mobility and social and institutional of international cooperation.

    Paper: The Challenges of Conservation of Industrial Heritage in Brazil: The Case of Companhia Textil Brasil Industrial

    The aim of this presentation is to highlight the challenges of the process of conservation of industrial heritage in Brazil, taking as an example the case of the “Companhia Têxtil Brasil Industrial”. The industrialization process in Brazil was a slow and gradual process, the result of numerous internal and external disputes that extended throughout the 19th century. The Companhia Têxtil Brasil Industrial complex, celebrating 150 years of existence (established in 1871), in the current municipality of Paracambi (Rio de Janeiro State), was one of the main factories built in that period, being considered one of the most important industries in imperial Brazil.

    14.15 - 14.45 Ian Jackson - RE: Powering the Valley: Past, Present and Future of Waterpower in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site

    14.15 - 14.45 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Ian Jackson
    Ian Jackson is a PhD researcher at the University of Nottingham where his thesis is focused on “Climate Change Mitigation: Learning from the Past to Unlock the Hydropower Potential of the Derbyshire Derwent Catchment”. He is a Board Member of Derwent Valley World Heritage Site.

    Paper: RE: Powering the Valley: Past, Present and Future of Waterpower in the Derwent Vallery Mills World Heritage Site

    With the early Derwent Valley Mills factories using renewable energy and the development of local ‘model’ farms to feed their communities, can these, and other similar industrial world heritage sites, become best practice locations that we can learn from, leading by example and supporting a fair and just transition to a net zero future?

    14.45 - 15.15 Professor Andrew Wilson - Saltaire World Heritage Site

    14.45 - 15.15 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Professor Andrew Wilson and Colleagues

    Paper: Saltaire World Heritage Site

    Drawing inspiration from the pioneering digital documentation research by Historic Environment Scotland that saw New Lanark as the first site to be scanned as part of the Scottish Ten project in August 2009, Professor Wilson will present work from Bradford's Visualising Heritage team at Saltaire World Heritage Site conducted since 2018. Saltaire has also been used to trial innovations using different 3D capture methods to record and monitor the fabric of the historic environment, drawing from recent projects such as the 'Virtual Bradford' project which is creating an open access digital twin and ultimately which will create a new digital representation of this 'model village' for a variety of differnt uses.

    15.30 - 16.00 Weiwei Xiao - Industrial Heritage Conservation in China

    15.30 - 16.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: WeiWei Xiao

    Weiwei Xiao is a postgraduate student in Museum Studies in the University of Leicester, and has a Master’s degree in Anthropology from Anhui University and a Bachelor’s degree in International Politics from Jilin University. She has received University of Leicester’s President’s Postgraduate Scholarship Awards 2020-2021. In addition, she is a member of the China Society for Anthropology of Arts. Her research interest includes World heritage studies, Museology and the museum approach to heritage.

    Paper: Industrial Heritage Conservation in China

    Different from its model in Western countries, which includes bottom-up initiatives focusing on industrial heritage and acombination of various social forces, industrial heritage conversation in China is usually government-led without social consensus and participation of other stakeholders. Due to different geographic conditions, economic development levels, and industrialisation bases, the state of industrial heritage conservation varies from region to region and city to city in China.

    16.00 - 16.30 Dr Luca Brunelli and Neil Mochrie - The Future of Live/Work in New Lanark

    16.00 - 16.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Speaker: Dr Luca Brunelli and Neil Mochrie

    Dr Luca Brunelli is Senior Lecturer and stage 2 leader at the Mackintosh School of Architecture (MSA) where he encourages students to explore the potential of architecture as a tool for political, societal and environmental change. He has been more than 15 years in professional practice in architecture and urban design in Spain. Neil Mochrie was raised in Glasgow, studied Architecture at the University of Strathclyde and currently lives in Edinburgh. Since becoming a registered Architect in 1989 he has worked in both private and public practice across Scotland and been a part-time Studio Tutor in Building Design Engineering at the University of Strathclyde from 1993 to 1995 and part-time Studio Tutor and Lecturer in Architectural Technology at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art from 2006 to the Present

    Paper: The Future of Live/Work in New Lanark

    Taking New Lanark as an early example of live/work urbanism, over the past 3 years the 2nd year studio at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art, asked the students to reflect on Robert Owen’s legacy within contemporary social and economic conditions. Studio-based practice is at the core of the Glasgow School of Art’s approach to teaching and learning, and the Mackintosh School of Architecture challenged students to apply their creative thinking to re-imagine the site to attract and host new residents and activities.

    17.45 - 18.15 KEYNOTE: Kate Pugh OBE - The Role of the National Commission for UNESCO

    17.45 - 18.15 SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN THEATRE
    Keynote Speaker: Kate Pugh OBE

    Kate Pugh OBE is a heritage and cultural specialist with extensive experience in national and international heritage. Kate is Chairman of the Advisory Group of the UK Cultural Protection Fund, managed by British Council in partnership with DCMS. She was appointed as Non-Executive Director for Culture at the UK National Commission for UNESCO in 2021. She is a trustee and the honorary secretary of Europa Nostra UK and of The Afghanistan Society. Mrs Pugh was awarded an OBE for services to heritage in the 2015 New Year Honours. She was elected as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 2019.

    Paper: The Role of the National Commission for UNESCO

    Kate Pugh OBE will give an overview of UNESCO and in particular World Heritage Centre policies and guidnace together with an update on the emerging trends and issues from the recent World Heritage Committee. She will outline the national and international role and responsibilities of the United Kingdom Commission for UNESCO (UKNC), as well as her own priorities as a Non-Executive Director for the Culture Portfolio within the UK Commission for UNESCO. Turning to the significance of World Heritage Sites in the UK, she will refer to UKNC's ground-breaking report 'The National Value of UNESCO Designations to the United Kingdom'. Kate will build on it to illustrate how these can be hotbeds for experimentation for local and global issues and in doing so continue the tradition of innovation established by Robert Owen at New Lanark. Finally, she will expand on how World Heritage Sites can and do create and sustain international relations.


    Round Table Topics & Speakers

    12.00 - 12.50 Roundtable: Part 1 - Heritage and Community Engagement

    12.00 - 12.50 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Heritage and Community Engagement - Coinciding with the launch of New Lanark Trust's Community Engagement Strategy, in line with the work with the Vision for Lanark, this session in two parts will explore the role of community in heritage. How do we manage the needs of living communities with the conservation of heritage? How can communities be a force for good in heritage?
    • Chair: Martin McManus
    • Martin McManus has 30 years' experience working in the public sector and was formerly South Lanarkshire Council's representative on the New Lanark World Heritage Site Partnership Group. He is currently a Communities Connected consultant specialising in supporting community engagement and capacity building activity.

    • Mari Felling
    • Mari Felling is a Senior Advisor and a specialist in cultural heritage at WSP consultancy firm in Stockholm. She holds a PhD in architectual theory and history. Her thesis dealt with post war society, architecture, and colours. Her current research involves social inclusion, cultural heritage, and visions of urban life.

    • Sylvia Russell
    • After retiring from 40 years of teaching and lecturing, Sylvia Russell became involved in many community groups including Lanark Lanimer Committee, Lanark Museum, Chair of Lanark Airshow Centenary Committee, Lanark Tolbooth, and Chair of Lanark Community Development Trust. In 2017, she received an MBE for her services to the community and heritage.

    • Melissa Reilly
    • Melissa Reilly currently works as a Digital Engagement Officer with Scottish Government and is a member of the Rural Youth Project Digital Champions team. Prior to working with the Scottish Government, Melissa worked on a range of community engagement projects within local organisations - Lanark Development Trust and New Lanark Trust.

    • Kenny Lean
    • Kenny Lean grew up in rural Clydesdale and studied landscape design in York. He has worked for over 17 years in Economic Development - building partnerships, securing EU funding and UK funding, supporting communities and organisations to grow and develop across South Lanarkshire. As Economic Development LEADER Manager with South Lanarshire Council since 2019, Kenny is passionate about developing the rural economy of Lanarkshire. He ensures that the strengths of the area and opportunties in the area - from its landscape, communities and heritage are fully explored through partnership working and utilising funding to help communities and businesses in the area grow, develop and thrive in a period of intense change.

    • Lucy Lannigan
    • Lucy Lannigan is a part-time Marketing Coordinator at New Lanark Trust who is working towards a OhD in Cultural Studies at Heriot Watt University. Her research is entitled 'Co-developing Models for Sustainable Community Development' and focuses on what the concept of 'community' means and assessing its usefulness in the context of sustainable community heritage.

    13.00 - 14.00 Roundtable: Part 2 - Heritage and Community Engagement

    13.00 - 14.00 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Heritage and Community Engagement - Coinciding with the launch of New Lanark Trust's Community Engagement Strategy, in line with the work with the Vision for Lanark, this session in two parts will explore the role of community in heritage. How do we manage the needs of living communities with the conservation of heritage? How can communities be a force for good in heritage?
    • Chair: Martin McManus
    • Martin McManus has 30 years' experience working in the public sector and was formerly South Lanarkshire Council's representative on the New Lanark World Heritage Site Partnership Group. He is currently a Communities Connected consultant specialising in supporting community engagement and capacity building activity.

    • Mari Felling
    • Mari Felling is a Senior Advisor and a specialist in cultural heritage at WSP consultancy firm in Stockholm. She holds a PhD in architectual theory and history. Her thesis dealt with post war society, architecture, and colours. Her current research involves social inclusion, cultural heritage, and visions of urban life.

    • Sylvia Russell
    • After retiring from 40 years of teaching and lecturing, Sylvia Russell became involved in many community groups including Lanark Lanimer Committee, Lanark Museum, Chair of Lanark Airshow Centenary Committee, Lanark Tolbooth, and Chair of Lanark Community Development Trust. In 2017, she received an MBE for her services to the community and heritage.

    • Melissa Reilly
    • Melissa Reilly currently works as a Digital Engagement Officer with Scottish Government and is a member of the Rural Youth Project Digital Champions team. Prior to working with the Scottish Government, Melissa worked on a range of community engagement projects within local organisations - Lanark Development Trust and New Lanark Trust.

    • Kenny Lean
    • Kenny Lean grew up in rural Clydesdale and studied landscape design in York. He has worked for over 17 years in Economic Development - building partnerships, securing EU funding and UK funding, supporting communities and organisations to grow and develop across South Lanarkshire. As Economic Development LEADER Manager with South Lanarshire Council since 2019, Kenny is passionate about developing the rural economy of Lanarkshire. He ensures that the strengths of the area and opportunties in the area - from its landscape, communities and heritage are fully explored through partnership working and utilising funding to help communities and businesses in the area grow, develop and thrive in a period of intense change.

    • Lucy Lannigan
    • Lucy Lannigan is a part-time Marketing Coordinator at New Lanark Trust who is working towards a OhD in Cultural Studies at Heriot Watt University. Her research is entitled 'Co-developing Models for Sustainable Community Development' and focuses on what the concept of 'community' means and assessing its usefulness in the context of sustainable community heritage.

    16.45 - 17.30 Roundtable: Heritage Designations and Digital Documentation

    16.45 - 17.30 BONNINGTON LINN ROOM
    Heritage Designations and Digital Documentation - Our panel of professionals will discuss how we document our heritage for the future, and the different ways that we go about this in the modern world. How can we use evolving technologies to document knowledge and assets? How should we balance traditional drawn surveys with digital documentation? Is digital documentation the most efficient way of documenting heritage?
    • Chair: Jane Masters
    • Jane Masters is Head of Heritage and Development at New Lanark Trust where she is responsible for the development and coordination of the World Heritage Site Management Plan and interpreting the rich history of the site fir its diverse audiences. She worked closely with the CDDV team for the Scottish 10 New Lanark scan.

    • Alastair Rawlinson
    • Alastair Rawlinson is Head of Digital Innovation and Learning with Historic Environment Scotland. He has extensive experience in heritage digital documentation and visualisation, and specialises in large scale, complex digital documentation projects. He is passionate about 3D technologies and the practical applications of 3D data for the benefit of historic and industrial sites.

    • David Willis
    • David Willis graduated from University of Edinburgh in 1974. He is a RIAS Conservation Accredited Architect, RIAS expert witness and adjudicator. His association with New Lanark began in 1971 when working with Ian G Lindsey on Owen's School building as a student. The Braxfield Row project with Jim Arnold began in 1974 - and the rest of the work in the village is history. He began working with Ian G Lindsey as a university student. The current practice was founded in 1984. He remains the sole founding partner, and has proudly embraced his son into the partnership.

    • Professor Andrew S. Wilson
    • Professor Andrew S. Wilson is an Archaeologist and Heritage Scientist with wide-ranging research interests in Digital Heritage, Human Bioarchaeology, Conservation, Taphonomy, and Forensic Archaeology. he has worked for the Smithsonian Institution, Wiltshire Council Conservation Service and in commercial archaeology.

    • Dr Ruxandra Stocia
    • Dr Ruxandra Stocia is an architect and urbanist specialising in the historic environment. She is a teacher and consultant with the Scottish Centre for Conservations Studies, and is a senior teaching fellow in architectural conservation at University of Edinburgh. She is an expert member of the International Scientific Committee for Theory and Philosophy of ICOMOS, and Forum UNESCO - University and Heritage.



    18.15 - 18.30 Closing Plenary - Bill Howat, Chair New Lanark Trust

 

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